Dangers Camping Near Boulder : Long form piece on transients, heroin, crime near Nederland by RustyTumbleweed in boulder

[–]legal_throwaway34 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Thank you for understanding. I miss seeing more of the good guys. I grew up in a city where the disabled, mentally ill homeless still craved nothing more than to matter. They wanted to be loved and have a purpose. I remember Boulder being that way but it has definitely changed. Word got out that we have free help for the needy. Free attracts all types unfortunately.

Dangers Camping Near Boulder : Long form piece on transients, heroin, crime near Nederland by RustyTumbleweed in boulder

[–]legal_throwaway34 29 points30 points  (0 children)

This is my point of dividing the good homeless versus the bad homeless. The shelters are very good at rejecting those who act violently or are actively using. This is necessary to protect the general population. There are many, many homeless people looking to make a better life for themselves. Life happened to them. They were abused emotionally, physically etc. etc. They have neglected mental issues. They ran into unfortunate events. They know they need help and they reach for what they can get. Boulder is good for this.

On the other hand, there's the career homeless. They just want to be drunk and get high on the money of generous others. They don't want to work because it will go against their addict lifestyle they are not willing to give up. Not all addicts have mental disorders. Some are just assholes. This is unfortunately real. They'll take handouts from the shelters and crash with helpful people knowing they can manipulate the system and thoughtful people into supporting them. Any spare money they have goes to cheap booze and/or hard drugs (I am openly not against weed, or LSD, MDMA used responsibly). They don't care about humanity because they think they're above it for not having to answer to anybody. They'll pass out around a campfire that hasn't been drowned. They'll run into traffic under the influence and slam on your window to get money. They work on guilt and generosity. They know it. They're confident in their lifestyle and know how to blame us for their place in life. To them, we're nothing but petty dummies who fall for it. They ruin the reputation of good homeless people who are some of the nicest people I've ever met.

My idea might sound crazy but I'd love to see a monitored campground for the homeless. Some homeless prefer the outdoors to the shelter. I get that. What if we had a campground for the homeless. Toss in a few fire pits to prevent poorly made campfires. Get a spigot there for water. I'm sure a regular drive-by from a Ranger or officer would keep things under control. Just add it to the patrol. It's very doable. I'd love to see it in my backyard and I'm one who has called the police over illegal campers with a fire. My property is on a dead-end in North Boulder. I have nothing but grass and trees behind me. I'm open to having the homeless stay there but I am not trained to monitor them nor do I have the time to keep an occasional eye on them 24/7. I sleep. I work. I go out. I don't want my house to burn down but I also don't want this whole town to be unaffordable housing, or camping for that matter.

Why isn’t this happening in Boulder? by hartz303 in boulder

[–]legal_throwaway34 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Also, this. The "L" towns look better everyday. I regret buying here but at least I'll make a ridiculous profit when I sell. Boulder's insanity has its benefits. I don't know why responses like your's get downvoted. Boulder has trouble objectively looking at itself. It's a very hypersensitive atmosphere.

Thoughts on removing posts from homeless individuals asking for help? by BeerInMyButt in boulder

[–]legal_throwaway34 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I do. I said mental health assistance would help many. However, we can't help those who don't want help. If those people are dangerous, we need to protect society from them. How do you plan to help those who don't want help?

Thoughts on removing posts from homeless individuals asking for help? by BeerInMyButt in boulder

[–]legal_throwaway34 4 points5 points  (0 children)

I'm all for mental health assistance. That would be great and I'd love to see more of that become a reality.

My problem is those who don't want that type of help and those who don't think they need to "get better". Career criminals need to choose to get better or be put away for the safety of society. I'm not saying criminalize homelessness. I'm saying that some homeless choose to be bad people and they are not fit to be in a shelter with those who are trying to get their lives together. Mental illness is also not something to be blamed for every bad person. Some people are just bad. Some people are not treatable. It's a sad reality but that's how life goes. There needs to be more effort in making a distinction.

Thoughts on removing posts from homeless individuals asking for help? by BeerInMyButt in boulder

[–]legal_throwaway34 2 points3 points  (0 children)

This is one example of many. The article is just use of one example. However, if you research Boulder jail bookings and listings, you will find many of the same type. I invite you to do some research for yourself if you'd like to see more examples. This research can also be applied to communities all over the country and the world. There are very different types of people using the shelters and not all of them are honest and good people. Please, before you criticize me or anybody else sharing my perspective, research further. Removing the bad apples, benefits the good in a huge way.

Thoughts on removing posts from homeless individuals asking for help? by BeerInMyButt in boulder

[–]legal_throwaway34 6 points7 points  (0 children)

I know I'm not the person you're responding to but I'd like to chime in from a legal perspective on how this effects the shelter and, in turn, the needy who use the shelter. It's not the camping or sleeping bags that are the issue. The post containing the article and information alluded to above has since been deleted but I was able to search it in the OP's history:

( https://www.reddit.com/r/boulder/comments/7nxv2r/boulder_man_freezes_to_death_christmas_eve_in_one/ )

This thread and that article post got me interested in some background research. According to public record we're dealing with two great examples of very different homeless people in that article. I think it's a good opportunity for us outsiders to learn the difference. Remember, all the info I'm stating is PUBLIC RECORD and anybody is able to access it and discuss it.

The man who passed didn't have many issues other than some minor things that are a blip on the court radar. He was a good employee and had a good reputation among peers. I absolutely support him getting shelter support. He's the type trying to get his life together and keep it that way. It's unfortunate that he may have acted out enough to be removed from the shelter. It's not a nice thought, but substance abuse is usually the problem when a good person uncharacteristically turns bad once or twice. It happens and it's a challenging decision for the shelter to turn away a person they know well and love. He would have been welcome back after his suspension. Not an "angel" but also not Satan.

The problem comes with a different type of homeless person who ruins it for the rest of them.

The man quoted in the article (most likely slandering the shelter) is the type to cause serious problems. He has a long, steady background of receiving support from shelters and other sources locally and across the country. There's no sign of trying to recover. He's not employed but has had some reports filed related to him scamming people for cash. He also has a long criminal history that is violent and the number of DUIs is something I haven't seen in my career up until this point. There's also some theft and restraining orders reported on him and none of this is old. It's not like he made some mistakes in the past and is trying to get better. He's more of the active career criminal type and a danger in the shelter. I can see why he's quick to attack the shelter. He's not had a smooth ride with them and is easily angered and vengeful (at least from what I've seen in my research). As I mentioned in other comments, this is not somebody I'd defend in the courtroom. Definitely not an "angel". Definitely not somebody trying to get back on his feet.

If you read the article, the stories of "1-minute late" and just a "flick" are a an obvious exaggeration. As a naturally emotional response, criminals often minimize actions on their side of the story and exaggerate those of the person(s) they are challenging. He also claims these are not his words, but those of an unnamed homeless advocate. This is another common tactic criminals use to give themselves more credibility. i.e. "Not just my story! Everybody thinks this!" Well who's everybody? Most likely nobody. Otherwise, he would have quickly offered up a name for further interviewing because that would have helped prove his story. Career criminals lie.

I've worked to defend many men who have to live in the shelter. I've gotten to know them and their lives well. There's never been an issue of mail denial that quickly. The mail room does get locked but if a resident arrives past closing and a mail attendant is there, they just grab the mail. It takes 2 seconds and zero effort. Next, a small flick on glass will not cause expulsion. Emotions are high and mental illness is common in the shelter. Things happen almost daily but expulsion is not as common as many think. Expulsion is a result of a violent situation that cannot be deescalated in a reasonable manner and short amount of time. The shelter is actually a place filled with respect and support for those who deserve it and give it back.

There is a camera on the mail area and in various other locations. For this reason, I highly doubt a shelter employee would try to get away with expelling the deceased for a "flick". This man in the article who gave the Facebook interview is damaging the shelter's reputation in a very public way. He doesn't care who he harms as long as he gets what he wants. On top of a bed, food and money, attention seems to be one of those things. Criminals are often always narcissists and this was his big day. If outsiders begin to think the shelter is not a healthy place for the homeless, donations are the first to drop. That's less sleeping bags and definitely less beds. People are going to read that article and believe what this criminal said. Despite how awful he states that shelter is, I'm sure he'll have no problem marching back into that same shelter for free food and a warm place to stay. That's not the type of person we want in these shelters, or in town. He also claims to have been friends with the deceased. I wouldn't be surprised if he was a consistent bad influence on him. Alcoholism and drug abuse spreads like a virus in these shelters and it's a major reason we need to remove the bad homeless from the bunch.

After beating cable lobby, Colorado city moves ahead with muni broadband - Fort Collins plans universal broadband, net neutrality, and gigabit speeds. by mvea in Futurology

[–]legal_throwaway34 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Also a Boulderite, for 14 years now. We've always been behind in so many things and I don't understand any of it. It could just be the culture of the place. Somehow Boulder talks big but holds itself back. Anybody want to cry over the light rail with me? I've run out of Comcast tears.